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Retire to Austria-it doesn't get any bett.er than here.! 5 properties cheaper than the 'Dunner's" new 1.2 million 2 bedroom apts in Ballsbridge Dublin.

1.1 million Euros:This very exclusive house with all comfort and quality does not spare any wishes. It has about. 5,5 ha ground so it is situated in a very sunny and calm position, only few km away from the golfcourse, the thermal spa of Bad Kleinkirchheim and the skiing facilities. You will find a spacious kitchen, dining room, winter garden, 4 bedrooms, each one with bathroom and WC. It also has a sauna, a wellness room, a jacuzzi, a shower and a relax room. A real selective property!

€ 1.100.000,00
A - 9535 Schiefling am See - Villen

Wörther See: Villach Austrian Tyrol 2 hours drive to Venice.green location, hillside situation, prestigious, quiet, sunny.Living area; 360,00 sqm.Land area 5000,00 sqm

This fantastic property is in a beautiful, calm and sunny position near the lake 'Wörthersee'. In addition to the villa there is a separate guest house with wine cellar, a party house, pool, sauna and solarium and 3 garages. The main house and the guest house have under floor heating, the party house and the pool have an open fire. A very impressive villa with a lot of potential.

1.1 million:This very exclusive house with all comfort and quality does not spare any wishes. It has about. 5,5 ha ground so it is situated in a very sunny and calm position, only few km away from the golfcourse, the thermal spa of Bad Kleinkirchheim and the skiing facilities. You will find a spacious kitchen, dining room, winter garden, 4 bedrooms, each one with bathroom and WC. It also has a sauna, a wellness room, a jacuzzi, a shower and a relax room. A real selective property!

159,000 euros: This well-tended house is on the boarder of the village in a calm and countrified situation above the city Radenthein. It was built in 1955 and was partly renovated in 2005. It consists of a big living-kitchen, 6 bedromms, 2 bathrooms and 2 WC. Furthermore there is a seperate building built on the main house with a garage. In the course of the renovation a new swimming pool was built which is heated by solar-energy. The house itself is heated by an oil-central heating. The vicinity to hot springs, skiing slopes and a golf-course makes the offer special.

128,000 euros: Yes you read that right.1You can find this nice house between the lake Millstättersee and the skiing area Bad Kleinkirchheim in a good position. The ground floor consists of a kitchen, living room, bathroom and WC. On the first floor there are a bedroom, 2 additional rooms and WC. The attic consists of 2 rooms and also a WC. It has oil-centralheating and also a central oven for wood. Beside the house there is also a storage room.

More info @ www.wohnreal.at

 

Why is irish property more than twice the price.?

By Brendan Keenan

Thursday September 06 2007

SHOULD have got more garlic, and sharpened the wooden stake. The coffin lid is creaking open, and there is a glimpse of the undead form -- of the property tax reliefs!

Actually, one could go on like this quite a bit. The property reliefs proved as hard to kill as any vampire in the old Hammer horror movies. Both Charlie McCreevy and Brian Cowen fired their silver bullets in vain for several budgets, until finally a heroic Brian Cowen delivered the coup de grace.

But Hammer always left room for a sequel. And it will be next year before the last of the abolished tax breaks finally expires. Nor did Mr Cowen ever say that he would never enter the ghastly crypt again. Just that he would be more careful next time.

So it is not exactly a surprise if something is stirring. In this case, it was a story based on a Freedom of Information Act request. It suggested that the Department of the Environment is interested in new tax reliefs -- much more targeted of course -- for key developments, especially those in areas designated under the National Spatial Strategy.

That seems to be as far as it goes, at present. The Department of Finance has the final say in such matters and no proposals appear to have been made to it.

Forecasts

As Tuesday's Exchequer returns showed, not to mention the general forecasts for much lower economic growth next year, the Department has plenty on its plate in preparing December's Budget without thinking of new tax reliefs.

But we cannot ignore those stirrings. As the saga of the declining property market unfolds, and the reassessment of credit and risk adds a whole new twist to the valuing of assets, the clamour for more relief for property buyers is sure to grow.

It is impossible to say for how long, or by how much, property prices will fall -- certainly in real terms -- from their peak in the spring of 2007. Just about the only thing everyone agrees upon is that, when the dust settles (or, as Warren Buffet would have it, when the tide goes out) the attitude to lending and risk will be quite different from that of the past six years or more.

But it is hard to escape the conclusion that those tax- breaks, like that cheap credit, will make the fall in prices worse. Lots of people profited mightily from them, but their effects are a threat to the market.

They acted like another form of "leverage", allowing buyers to pay more for property and accept a lower yield from their investments than they would otherwise have been willing to accept. Now, yield is back in vogue, and future prices are uncertain. What is certain is that the price an investor will pay to get a 5pc yield, without a tax break, is an awful lot less than that which they could pay when they were prepared to accept 2pc yields, with a 42pc tax write-off thrown in.

It is not just in Ireland that there will be clamour for relief from these uncomfortable realities. Last week, President Bush announced plans to guarantee the mortgages of some subprime borrowers who cannot meet their repayments, while sternly rejecting the bailing out of the loan sharks who sold them the mortgages.

In Ireland, the cries for help are likely to take a different form. One reason for thinking so is the system of "stress-testing", where borrowers' ability to repay was further assessed on the basis of the interest rate being 2 percentage points higher than the actual rate.

Here we come to the curious features of the Irish property market. This stress-testing is very unusual, perhaps unique. On the other side, the tax incentives for buying-to-let were remarkably generous; perhaps even unique as well.

There could be only one effect from these two policies. First-time buyers were forced down, or out, of the market. In all the sorry annals of political hypocrisy there can be few to match the combination of constant bleating from Government politicians about the plight of first-time buyers, and policies tailor-made to screw them.

So the hit to the Irish market is likely to come, not in defaults, but in prices. The excess price from tax reliefs will have to be sweated out, as well as the impact of higher interest rates and now, the impact of tighter credit until prices reach a level that buyers are able, and willing, to spend.

That sounds like a recipe for a price crash. But there are grounds for hope. So far, the Irish market is following the classic path in such cycles.

Having held out for a year or so, the builders, typically, are beginning to crack and cut prices. Homeowners who urgently need to sell are doing the same. Worryingly, there are signs that buyers are holding off in the belief of better bargains ahead.

Housing

So far, so bad. On the positive side, construction has been cut dramatically, and there is no huge stock of unsold new houses, as in the US. Affordability is well within historic levels and the underlying demand for housing is strong. And that stress-testing may well mean that Irish lenders do not have to restrict credit to the extent that more profligate colleagues in other countries are likely to do.

There are a lot of maybes there, but a price crash -- which I will define as a fall of a third or more -- may yet be avoided. That will not stop the howls from those who see the value of their investments going down; from builders and landowners who cannot get the juicy returns of the past decade; and simple blackmail from developers saying they won't get on with the job unless they get a bung from the taxpayer.

All should be told to put a sock in it, of course. But one has one's doubts that they will. The power of politically-directed tax patronage is as addictive to politicians as any vampire's bite.

The best hope may be that the Exchequer will need every tax euro it can get and won't have enough to chuck around in damaging subsidies.

But just in case, has anyone got a number for Dr van Helsing?